Tansley Village

Men from Tansley who died in World War 1

WW1 War Memorial in Tansley Church

In memory of those men from Tansley
who gave the supreme sacrifice

To see photographs of the cemeteries where they are buried or remembered click on the name of the cemetery.

Godfrey Hallows Barber
Godfrey Hallows was born on the 20th November 1886 to Thomas Edward and Mary Barber and was their eighth child. He worked with his father in the village as a rope maker and then prior to the war worked in the tape mills in Lumsdale. He joined the Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) in October 1916 at the age of 29 and was reported missing on the 22nd August 1917, aged 30, after being in France one month and just 8 months after enlisting. He is buried in the Birr Cross Cemetery at Zillebeke in Belgium.

C.C.Booth Headstone

Charles Edward Booth
Charles was born in 1889 to Abraham and Sarah Booth and was baptised at Holy Trinity Church, Tansley on Sunday 7th July 1889 by the Revd. Jas. Pearson.
.His father Abraham was born in Tansley and was a wood turner by trade. In all, Abraham and Sarah had 11 children, 5 boys and 6 girls so Charles grew up in a large family and went to school in Tansley.
On the 1st December 1915, at the age of 26, he joined the 208th Protection Company of the Royal Defence Corps. He died on Thursday 9th May 1918 and is buried in Holy Trinity Churchyard, Tansley.

William James Briddon
William, the 7th of 10 children, was born in November 1881 to William and Maria Briddon. William senior was the village blacksmith. In August 1915, at the age of 35, William joined the Royal Field Artillery and became a driver to the Company. He had served 18 months in France when he was killed at the age of 40 on the 7th December 1917. He is buried in the Hermies Hill British Cemetery near Pas de Calais in France.

William James Briddon as a young lad

Isaac Sowter Fox
Isaac was the son of Annie and Sowter Fox of Redhill Farm in Tansley and husband of Annie Fox of Cross Farm at Higham, Alfreton. He joined the South Staffordshire Regiment in June 1917 and shortly afterwards went over to France. Just 10 months later, on the 10th April 1918, he was killed and is buried in the La Brique Military Cemetery No. 2 at Ieper (Ypres), Belgium. In civilian life he was worked at Scotland Nurseries in Tansley.

Albert V.Gratton
Albert joined the 9th Battalion of the York and Lancaster Regiment and died on the 13th March 1916. He is remembered in the Rue-David Military Cemetery at Fleurbaix, Pas de Calais in France.

John Woodward Gratton
John was the son of the late C.H.Gratton and of Kate Gratton (stepmother) of Sheffield. He joined the West Yorkshire regiment and died aged 22 on Sunday 14th April 1918. He is remembered on the Tyne Cot Memorial at Zonnebeke in Belgium.

Harry Harrison
Harry joined the 2nd/8th Battalion of the Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment) and was killed on the 7th April 1917. He is remembered in the Vadencourt British Cemetery at Maissemy in France.

Job Horace Haslam
Job was born to Job and Elizabeth Haslam on the 25th July 1892 and was their first and possibly only child. He joined the 2/6 Battalion of the Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment) at the age of 23. His mother died just 5 months later. Just under 2 years after joining, at the age of 25, he was killed in action during the German attack at Mory L’Abbaye in France. He has no known grave and is remembered on the Arras memorial in France.

William Andrew Hughes
William was born to William Andrew, a Farmer, and Lily Hughes on the 31st October 1891. William grew up on the farm and after his father died he managed the farm for his mother. He applied for exemption from the Forces but although the Military Authorities did not oppose his appeal he was ordered to join up on the 6th May 1917 at the age of 25. Before the war William had served 6 years with the Derbyshire Yeomanry so he enlisted with the 2/8 Battalion of the Sherwood Foresters. He was on his way to France just 3 months later to join the British Offensive which has started in July 1917.
William was fatally wounded in his leg, thigh and arms and taken to the 47th Casualty Clearing Station where he died the following day on the 28th September 1917 at the age of 25, just 5 months after joining and 2 months after crossing the channel. His body lies in the Dozinghem Military Cemetery at Poperinge in Belgium. He is also remembered on his father’s grave at Holy Trinity Church, Tansley.

Henry Johnson

Henry Johnson
Henry was the 7th child of thirteen born in 1892 to John and Ellen Johnson. Before the war Henry worked as a coal miner. He enlisted in the 1st Battalion of the Sherwood Foresters in February 1918 at the age of 24. Shortly afterwards the rebellion broke out in Ireland so he and his regiment were sent over there. Early in 1917 he was sent to France and a very short time later he was killed by a shell in the attack at Andover on Sunday 4th March 1917 aged 26. He has no known grave but is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial at the Somme.

Alfred Keeling
Alfred was the fourth of six children born to Arthur and Ann Keeling and came into this world on the 10th February 1896. His father was a painter and paperhanger by trade. After leaving school, Alfred worked in the Tape Mills in Lumsdale. Alfred joined the Royal Field Artillery as a gunner on Saturday the 18th April 1916 just 2 months after his 20th Birthday just one year after his older brother William was killed at the Front.
Alfred was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field. He and a companion were out in no-mans land with an Observation Officer to locate the enemy’s position when they were shelled. His two companions were injured so Gunner Keeling gave them first aid and after a long struggle got them back to their own lines.
Little more than a month later he was killed in action on the 21st July 1917 and was buried in the field where he fell. His body now rests in Perth Cemetery at Zillebeke, near Ipres (Ypers) in Belgium. Of the three brothers who went to war, William and Alfred were killed.

Headstone for Alfred Keeling
Wilfred Keeling
Wilfred the second of four children was born to Arthur and Ann Keeling in September 1894 and was 17 months older than his brother Alfred. He enlisted in the 19th Battalion of the sherwood Foresters in September 1914 just seven days before his 20th Birthday. Fourteen months later he was killed in action during the attack on Quadrangle support near Contalmaison in France early in the Somme offensive. He has no known grave and is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial near the Somme in France.

Gordon Paramore Charles Gordon Paramore
Gordon (as he was always known) was born in London and was an artist before enlisting. He was a Captain in the 8th Battalion of the Royal Berkshire Regiment who died aged 30 on Saturday 25th September 1915. He was the son of Mrs. L.E. Paramore who was living in Tansley and the late Dr. Richard Paramore who was born in Devon and was a doctor. Gordon is buried in the Dud Corner Cemetery at Loos, Pas de Calais in France.

Gordon Paramore's Grave
William Poyser
William was born to Benjamin and Jane Poyser in 1897. After leaving school he worked at Lea Mills. He was a promising musician and could play several instruments but his favourite was the violin. He played with the Matlock Silver Prize Band and was a valuable member of the Tansley Wesleyan Church.
At the age of 19 William joined the 6th Battalion of the York and lancaster regiment on the 5th June 1916 and after three months training was sent to France where he acted as Company runner. He was killed instantly on the battlefield on Wednesday 17th August 1917 when he was only 20 years old whilst the Company was consolidating its newly captured lines. He has no known grave but is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial at the Somme in France.

William Rawson
William, the eighth child was born to William and Mary Rawson on the 14th November 1897. Prior to joining the forces William worked at Mr Shaw’s quarries in Matlock. He joined the Sherwood Foresters on the 15th May 1915 when he was just over 17 years old. He was killed in action on the 31st July 1917 during the attack at the river Steenbeck in Belgium at the age of 19 years. His body lies in the Buffs Road Cemetery near Ipres (Ypres) in Belgium.

Frederick John Redfern
John was born on the 8th April 1897 to John and Martha Redfern who farmed at Riber, near Tansley. Before joining up, John worked in the office of Mr Fletcher, a miller in Wirksworth. At the age of 19, John enlisted and joined the Yorkshire Regiment. He spent 10 months in England before sailing over to France and then just 11 months later he was killed in action on the 22nd March 1918 at the age of 21. His body was never found but he is remembered on the Arras Memorial in France.

Sydney Richardson
Sydney was born in 1886 in Sharrow, Yorkshire, to William and Annie Richardson. The family moved to Tansley and Sydney worked at Tansley Wood Mills. In August 1914, Sydney enlisted in the Sherwood Foresters. He went with the Battalion to India in 1914 but was soon sent to France where he was hit by shrapnel in his side during the attack on Rouges Bancs. His wounds were so bad that he died on the 9th May 1915 at the age of 29. He has no known grave but is remembered on the Ploegsteert Memorial in France.

Victor Edward Shore
Victor Edward was born on the 5th June 1897 to Edward and Julia Shore. His father was originally a horse breaker but worked with horses all his life. Before the war Victor worked at Scholes Tansley Mills and was a highly respected young man. He enlisted in the Sherwood Foresters in August 1915 when he was 18 years old. he had been serving for more than 2 years in France as a signaller when he died from gas poisoning on the 23rd August 1918 at the age of 21. He is buried in the Mont Huon Cemetery at le Treport near Dieppe.

Samuel Smith
Samual was the son of John and Mary Smith who lived in Long Row, Tansley. He was born on the 29th June 1883 and before enlisting he worked as a Nursery Hand at Tansley Old Nurseries. Samuel Married Harriett around 1906 and went to live in Long Row, Tansley. In June 1914, 14 days before his 33rd birthday Samuel enlisted in the Leicestershire Regiment but later transferred to the South Staffordshire Regiment. Within 6 months of sailing to France he contracted Bronchitis and died in hospital on the 7th February 1917 aged 33 leaving behind Harriett and two young children. His body lies in Grove Town Cemetery, Meaulte in France.

John Stone
John, or Jack as he was known, was the 4th child of Charles and Mary Stone. Before the war John worked in the Tape Mills in Tansley. He joined the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers in May 1915. He was in France for a year without getting home on leave and it was on the 7th June 1917 that he was killed and died instantly from a machine gun bullet to the head alongside his officer who was also wounded. John is buried in Irish House Cemetery, a small cemetery behind a farmhouse, just south of Ieper (Ypres) in Belgium.



John Stone
Arthur Thorpe
Arthur, the fourth of seven children, was born to Arthur and Mary Ellen Thorpe on the 21st March 1897. His father was a miller and his mother a dressmaker. Before the war Arthur worked in the Tape Mills until he joined the Sherwood Foresters in 1915. He had been in France for a year with the signals section when he died on the 7th June 1917 during the attack on Hill 60 in Belgium. He died instantly from a sniper’s bullet whilst working as a signaller in the German trenches they had just captured. He was buried in the trenches where he died. He is remembered in Bedford House Cemetery, Zillebeke, near Ieper (Ypers) in Belgium

Harry Toft
Harry was the son of Hiram and Agnes Toft of Lathkill Cottage, Matlock Cliff. He joined the 26th Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers and was killed on the 20th September 1917. He is remembered on the Tyne Cot Memorial at Zonnebeke in Belgium.

Arthur Toplis
Arthur was the first child, and first of four boys, born to James and Elizabeth Toplis who lived in Lumsdale. Prior to joining the army he worked at Drabbles Mill in Lumsdale. He tried to enlist in the army four times but was rejected each time. However he was accepted on the fifth attempt and joined the Sherwood Foresters in July 1915. He later transferred to the Royal Warwickshire Regiment just before going over to France, just before his 21st birthday. Just nine months later on the 1st April 1917 he lost his life in the successful action by the British to capture the village of Epehy in France. He is buried in the Epehy Wood Farm Cemetery a little to the west of the village.

Harold Twigg
Harold joined the 11th Battalion of the East Yorkshire Regiment and died on the 14th February 1919. He is buried in Holy Trinity Churchyard in Tansley.

John Walter Twigg
John Walter was born on the 18th May 1896, the 9th and penultimate child of James and Christine Twigg who lived on Matlock Cliff. Before he joined the army he worked for Mr Pearson at Yew Tree Farm. John Walter enlisted in the Sherwood Foresters on the 18th April 1916 just one month before his 20th birthday and also on his parent’s 35th wedding anniversary but later transferred to the Royal Irish Rifles
After only 3 months in England he crossed to France in July 1916. Just over one year later on the 16th August 1917, he was killed in action at the age of 21. He has no known grave and is remembered on the Tyne Cot Memorial in Belgium. He is also remembered on his parents headstone in Holy Trinity Churchyard, Tansley.

Albert Watts
Albert Victor was the seventh of eleven children born to Thomas William and Mary Watts and came into the world on the 8th January 1895. Before the war, Albert Victor worked as a stonemason in one of the local quarries. He met Florrie whom he married and then went to live at Mansfield Woodhouse.
He originally joined the Sherwood Foresters but later transferred to the Manchester Regiment. He was killed in France, aged 23, on Friday 5th April 1918. He has no known grave but is remembered on the Arras Memorial.

Frederick Webster
Frederick was the fifth child of Joseph and Mary Ann Webster and was born in 1894 at The Cliff, Tansley. His father described himself as a Hawk Pedlar but he eventually opened a shop on Nottingham Road, Tansley which survived in the family until the 1990s. Before the war, Frederick spent 2 years in the City of Manchester Police and then, along with some other constables joined the Grenadier Guards in January 1915 at the age of 21.
Fifteen months later, Frederick was killed in action on Easter Sunday night, 23rd April 1916 when he was working out of the trenches to clear the drainage to the trenches. It had been raining hard for 48 hours and the drainage from the trenches had been blocked by shell fire. Frederick was killed by a sniper’s bullet to the head and died almost immediately. He was buried close to where he fell but now heis body lies in the Ypres Reservoir Cemetery along with many of his colleagues.
John H. White
John Henry was born on the 25th June 1881, the fourth of six children born to John and Lucy White who lived on The Knoll, Tansley. After leaving school John worked in the Tape Mills in Tansley but when he reached the age of 18, in 1900, he enlisted in the Sherwood Foresters where he spent the next 17 years with the army in India and the Straits Settlements. During this time he became one of the best athletes in the Regiment and won many prizes in boxing and cross country running.
After completing his tour of duty he came home early in 1914 and started work with Rolls Royce in Derby. He was recalled to the Colours on August 1914 and served again with the Sherwood Foresters. He was killed in action during a raid on the German trenches at Philosophe in France on Monday 28th May 1917 at the age of 36. His body now lies in the Philosophe British Cemetery at Marzingarbe in France.

Joel B. White
Joel Brutnell was born in 1898, one of 12 children born to Obadiah and Sarah Ann White of Rock Terraces, Tansley. Obadiah was a blacksmith and had the smithy attached to John Garton’s Lower Bleach Works in Lumsdale. Before joining the army Joel worked in Messrs Smart’s quarries in Matlock. He enlisted in the Sherwood Foresters but was later transferred to the Labour Corps.
Early in 1918 Joel received a wound in his thigh and spent some months recovering in England. He was sent back to France but within a fortnight he was wounded again in the same place. Again he was brought back to a hospital in Sheffield where his mother managed to visit him. However, after two weeks he died from Pneumonia following on from Influenza on the 13th November 1918 at the age of 20. He was buried 3 days later in the churchyard at Holy Trinity, Tansley. Obadiah and Sarah had four sons serving in the war, Joel, Edward who was awarded the Military Medal and Bar and also the DCM, Thomas and Jim, all of whom, except Joel, survived the war.

James Henry Woodhouse
James Henry was born in 1880 to Joseph and Mary Woodhouse who lived in Lumsdale. As a young man, James was employed at the Messrs F.H. Drabble Lumsdale Mills and was also a member of the Matlock Silver Prize Band.
James enlisted in the Sherwood Foresters and was killed during the attack at St. Julien in Belgium on Wednesday 26th September 1917 at the age of 37. He has no known grave but is remembered on the Tyne Cot Memorial in Belgium. He is also remembered on his father’s headstone in Holy Trinity Churchyard at Tansley.

George P. Wragg
George Palfreman was born in 1887, the third child of John and Margaret Wragg who lived on Matlock Cliff. George enlisted at Matlock in the Durham Light Infantry in February 1917 at the age of 30. Very shortly afterwards he was in France and was killed in the battle of Loos. George had no known grave but is remembered on the Loos Memorial.